CV & BIO

Sally Wyatt is Professor of Digital Cultures at Maastricht University.

Sally grew up in Canada, and has degrees from Canadian, British and Dutch universities. She has worked at universities and other academic institutions in the UK and the Netherlands.

More than 30 years of experience in teaching and research

Sally Wyatt’s background is in economics (BA McGill, 1976; MA Sussex, 1979) and science and technology studies (PhD Maastricht, 1998).

She has more than 30 years of experience in teaching and research about technology policy and about the relationship between technological and social change, focusing particularly on issues of social exclusion and inequality.

Sally has more than 30 years of experience in teaching and research about technology policy and about the relationship between technological and social change

Sally  has worked at the Universities of Sussex, Brighton, East London and Amsterdam as well as at the British Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) and the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences (KNAW).

Professor Sally Wyatt (1959) is Professor of Digital Cultures in the Faculty of Arts & Social Sciences (FASoS) at Maastricht University. She is part of the Science & Technology Studies research programme. Until the end of 2017, she was also the director of The Netherlands Graduate Research School of Science, Technology and Modern Culture (WTMC) (2011-2017).

Wyatt was born and grew up in Canada. She holds a BA in Economics from McGill University (1979), an MA in Economic Policy & Planning from Sussex University (1980), and a PhD from Maastricht University (1998) (supervised by Wiebe Bijker).

Before moving to the Netherlands in 1999, she worked at the Science Policy Research Unit (SPRU) at Sussex University (1980-86), the Economic and Social Research Council (1986-88), Centre for Research into Innovation and Management at Brighton University (1988-90), and the Department of Innovation Studies at the University of East London (1990-99).

While in the Netherlands she has worked at the University of Amsterdam (1999-2006), and at the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences (KNAW) (2006-17).